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C-EENRG

Cambridge Centre for Environment, Energy and Natural Resource Governance

Studying at Cambridge

 

Ida Sognnaes

Ida  Sognnaes

Centre Researcher


Biography:

Ida Sognnaes is a PhD researcher at C-EENRG working on the interactions between energy, environment, and economic systems. Her thesis examines the implications of using different theoretical frameworks in models that guide the low-carbon transition. 

Ida has a broad background in the natural and social sciences revolving around environmental issues. She has a masters degree (MA) in Energy and Resources from UC Berkeley and a masters degree (5 year MSc) in Applied Physics and Mathematics from The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). In addition to this, she has a bachelors degree (BSc) in Political Science from NTNU.

Ida has in the past worked on climate change modeling (The Norwegian Meteorological Institute), adaptation to climate change in the arctic (DNV-GL, Norway), ecosystems-climate change interactions (Rocky Mountains Biological Laboratory), transport optimisation (SINTEF, Norway), and socio-ecosystem dynamics of natural-human networks (UC Berkeley). 

Research interests

Low-Carbon Transition; Ecological Economics; Integrated Assessment Models; Energy-Economy-Environment Models; Energy and Economic Growth; Innovation; Environmental Policy; History of Economic Thought; Philosophy of Science.

Teaching

Ida is currently supervising 3E11 Environmental Sustainability and Business (4th year Engineering). She has previously supervised RM01 Quantitative Research Methods (MPhil in Land Economy). While at UC Berkeley, Ida taught ER 102 Quantitative Aspects of Global Environmental Problems (upper division). Prior to this she has also taught Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods (1st year), Computer Fundamentals (1st year), Linear Algebra (1st year), and Calculus I (1st year).   

Other Projects

Ida is a co-founder and convenor of the CRASSH and Institute for New Economic Thinking Young Scholars Initiative funded project The Politics of Economics. Prior to this Ida ran Paper 0